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May 16, 1953

INTRA-ARTERIAL AND INTRAVENOUS BLOOD INFUSION IN HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK: COMPARISON OF EFFECTS ON CORONARY BLOOD FLOW AND ARTERIAL PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

Boston
From the Department of Physiology, Harvard School of Public Health.

JAMA. 1953;152(3):208-212. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.03690030008003
Abstract

The use of intra-arterial blood transfusion has, in recent years, acquired an increasing vogue in the therapy of oligemic shock. The literature has been comprehensively reviewed by Seeley and Nelson.1 Those favoring the use of this procedure feel that the intra-arterial route more quickly and effectively elevates tissue perfusion rates, especially coronary artery flow. An insufficient coronary flow had not previously been demonstrated in oligemic shock. Further, no data are known to the authors in which a comparison of the effect on coronary flow has been made when using both the intra-arterial and intravenous routes for infusion. The patent desirability of having such information stimulated the collection of the data presented below.

It was realized at the outset of these investigations that the extent to which we would be able to draw sound conclusions would depend on how rigidly conditions were controlled when the effects of arterial and venous

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