[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.232.62.209. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
March 25, 1939

AN OUTBREAK OF ANTHRAX INFECTION IN MINKS WITH INFECTION OF A RANCH OWNER

Author Affiliations

St. Louis

From the Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School.

JAMA. 1939;112(12):1148-1149. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.62800120001009

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Anthrax infection in cattle, sheep, goats and horses has long been recognized as a potential source of human infection, and appropriate measures have been taken to protect the public against this danger. As a result of such measures, the incidence in human beings has been greatly lowered, perhaps to an irreducible minimum in many parts of the world. The anthrax bacillus is also known to be pathogenic for rabbits, guinea pigs, rats and mice, while dogs, swine, cats, birds and cold-blooded animals are relatively insusceptible. The susceptibility of the mink, as far as can be learned, has not previously been reported.

In recent years the artificial breeding of minks has become an industry of considerable importance, and ranches of from 100 to 2,000 minks are widely scattered through the country, especially in the Northern states. Standard diets for these animals include fish and meat, usually horse meat because of its

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×