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Article
July 25, 1953

THE NEED TO TEACH INDUSTRIAL HEALTH TO MEDICAL STUDENTS

JAMA. 1953;152(13):1262. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.63690130031026

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Abstract

There is an acute and constantly increasing need for more and better medical performance in American industry, with particular reference to the application of practical measures of preventive medicine. This need is greatest in small industrial plants. A great opportunity is now open to the medical profession, in that almost any contribution made by it toward the solution of the obvious hygienic problems of industry will greatly improve its performance and demonstrate its usefulness to society. This is even more significant because the employees of small industrial plants represent more than half of our total industrial population. Professional responsibility and prestige demand that the attention of physicians and medical educators be directed toward the problems of human health that derive from the most characteristic and insistent activity of modern life—technological industrial production. The productive functioning of this segment of our population, impaired as it is by the inroads of preventable

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