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Article
August 1, 1953

DIABETES IN A NEW ENGLAND TOWN: REPORT OF FOUR YEAR PROGRESS STUDY OF THE OXFORD, MASS., DIABETES SURVEY OF 1946-1947

Author Affiliations

U.S.P.H.S.; Boston

Dr. Wilkerson is Medical Director and Chief of the Diabetes Section, Division of Chronic Disease and Tuberculosis. Dr. Krall is from the Joslin Clinic.

JAMA. 1953;152(14):1322-1329. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.03690140030007
Abstract

The state of 70 diabetics after a lapse of time and the challenge of the premise "once a diabetic, always a diabetic" prompted a return to the town of Oxford, Mass., to study those persons previously identified as having diabetes in a community survey there. The results of the original survey had been interpreted, by some authorities, to mean that there were over one million unknown cases in this country. Of equal interest was a study of the behavior of incipient diabetes, or the so-called prediabetic state. In the winter of 1946-1947, a diabetes survey was made of 70.6% of the entire population of 4,983 persons in Oxford, Mass. The objective was to determine the prevalence of diabetes in an American community and to study methods for screening large groups for diabetes.1 On the fourth anniversary of the Oxford survey, a progress study was begun in order to determine

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