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April 22, 1939

METABOLISM OF THE BRAIN DURING INSULIN AND METRAZOL TREATMENTS OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

Author Affiliations

ALBANY, N. Y.

From the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Albany Medical College, Union University, and Bellevue Psychiatric Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, New York University Medical College.

JAMA. 1939;112(16):1572-1573. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800160036009
Abstract

A previous communication1 appearing in The Journal was concerned with the possible effects of insulin and metrazol in patients with schizophrenia. The conclusions were based on observations of animals, but methods were used which did not duplicate those employed in the treatment of schizophrenia. The present communication presents a brief summary of the chief results obtained in patients with schizophrenia undergoing the insulin and metrazol treatments. Since these treatments change cerebral function, studies of cerebral metabolism were made.

The methods used for the study of the cerebral metabolism of the patients include the simultaneous collection of samples of arterial blood entering the brain and of the blood of the internal jugular vein, which represents the return flow from that organ. These samples are analyzed for oxygen and dextrose. The differences between the venous and arterial contents indicate the cerebral utilization of oxygen and dextrose.2

Table 1 discloses the

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