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April 29, 1939

TEMPORARILY POSITIVE KAHN AND WASSERMANN REACTIONS: IN INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, and the Medical Service of the New Haven Hospital.

JAMA. 1939;112(17):1682-1683. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800170028009
Abstract

The fact that temporarily positive serologic tests for syphilis may occur in infectious mononucleosis without evidence of syphilis has been noted but is not generally recognized. Apparently the earliest notation of this finding was made in 1928 by Löhe and Rosenfeld,1 who described what they termed "monozytenangina" in a housewife aged 40. In the light of present knowledge this case would seem quite compatible with the angiose variety of infectious mononucleosis. It was Weber,2 however, who in 1930 first called attention to the fact that temporarily positive serologic tests for syphilis may occur in glandular fever. He reported three cases which all yielded transiently positive serologic reactions as evidenced by positive Wassermann or Meinicke tests. A year later Gooding3 described a series of twenty-seven cases (from the London epidemic of 1930) in which sixteen cases gave either a positive or an "incompletely" positive Wassermann reaction. Those cases

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