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May 6, 1939

BOWEL ANTIGEN: IV. THE CLINICAL USE OF A NEW METHOD TO DETERMINE THE PRESENCE OF THE VIRUS OF LYMPHOGRANULOMA VENEREUM IN THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF INTESTINAL INVOLVEMENTS

Author Affiliations

Associate in Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Medical School; Physician (Consultant in Digestive Diseases), Diagnostic Clinic, and Assistant Visiting Physician, Johns Hopkins Hospital BALTIMORE

From the Gastro-Enterological Section and Laboratories of the Medical Clinic of the Johns Hopkins University and Hospital.

JAMA. 1939;112(18):1788-1792. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800180012004
Abstract

I. EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL BACKGROUND FOR THE CLINICAL USE OF BOWEL ANTIGEN1  Involvements of the intestine of known cause are those due to neoplasms, bacterial and parasitic infections, bacterial toxins associated with food poisoning, vitamin deficiencies and the excretion of poisonous chemicals. A decade ago lymphogranuloma venereum, now generally regarded as due to a virus, was associated with rectal stricture because of the frequent concomitant occurrence of the latter condition with a positive Frei reaction. More recently some authors have assumed that a positive Frei reaction associated with intestinal diseases indistinguishable pathologically and clinically from bowel disorders of diverse or unknown origin is indicative that this virus is the cause. This is true in many instances, but given a specific case it is not possible merely by means of the Frei reaction to establish such a connection. Even the clinical aspects

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