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Article
September 7, 1946

WILL THE FAMILY DOCTOR SURVIVE?Chairman's Address

Author Affiliations

Winston-Salem, N. C.
From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College.

JAMA. 1946;132(1):1-4. doi:10.1001/jama.1946.02870360003001
Abstract

At a time when the medical pendulum is swinging further and further toward specialization, the future of general practice offers an endless field for speculation— and endless speculations are being offered about it. The current controversy regarding the family doctor's place in the scheme of medical practice recalls the words of Solomon "The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun."1

Some of you are old enough to remember that after the first world war there was a similar trend toward specialism. Then, as now, obituary notices of the family doctor were being published. Long before World War I—in 1902—Sir William Osler told the Canadian Medical Association that "it is amusing to read and hear of the passing of the family physician."2

FACTORS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE 

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