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May 13, 1939

ADENOCARCINOMA OF THE BREAST COINCIDENTAL WITH STRENUOUS ENDOCRINE THERAPY

Author Affiliations

Hines, Ill.

From the Tumor Clinic and Cancer Research Unit, Veterans Administration Facility.

JAMA. 1939;112(19):1933-1934. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.62800190001012
Abstract

Estrogenic substance induces mammary cancer in mice usually only after several months' application. The carcinogenic agents likewise require considerable periods of application. Injections of estrogenic substance or of carcinogenic chemicals in rather excessive doses may shorten the time of appearance of experimental tumors.

The ordinary therapeutic doses of estrogenic substance and the rather short periods of treatment should not involve a risk of the subsequent development of cancer. A substitution therapy extending over many months does involve such a risk, especially if the woman treated presents a family history of mammary cancer and may thus supposedly be classed as susceptible.

Cramer1 has presented an excellent review of the etiology of mammary cancer in man and in mice. Olch2 expressed the belief that prolonged ovarian activity during the usual menopausal ages is detrimental or of no benefit to the mammary parenchyma. Crossen and Hobbs3 noted the high incidence

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