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May 20, 1939

THE MIND OF MAN AND HIS SECURITY: PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS

Author Affiliations

WAUWATOSA, WIS.

JAMA. 1939;112(20):2003-2006. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800200001001
Abstract

One by one the great plagues that used to devastate mankind are being overcome. No longer does civilized man live in constant fear of cholera, smallpox and bubonic plague. Typhoid has become so rare that many a modern physician has never seen a case of this disease. Even diphtheria is being brought so certainly under man's control that last year twenty-four cities in the United States did not have a single death from diphtheria. Hardly a decade passes without some new announcement of a phenomenal discovery. In our own time we have seen arsphenamine for syphilis, insulin for diabetes, liver for pernicious anemia, biologic preparations for pneumonia and for scarlet fever, sulfanilamide and sulfapyridine for streptococcic and pneumococcic and similar infections. We have seen the rise of physical therapy and the growth of a new field called allergy. We have seen life expectancy rise from 40 years at birth to

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