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May 20, 1939

HEREDITARY DEFORMING CHONDRODYSPLASIA: REPORT OF TEN CASES IN ONE FAMILY

Author Affiliations

BATAVIA, N. Y.

JAMA. 1939;112(20):2026-2030. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800200024007
Abstract

My purpose in this paper is to report ten cases of such embarrassment; that is, ten cases of a relatively uncommon hereditary disease known as hereditary deforming chondrodysplasia.

Hereditary deforming chondrodysplasia is, as the name implies, a hereditary condition in which abnormal cartilaginous growth results in deformity. Although not all cases show deformities, the name used in this paper has become the accepted designation for this disease and is better and more descriptive than most of the synonymous terms, among which are Ollier's disease, hereditary multiple exostoses, diaphysial aclasis, hereditary multiple enchondromas, multiple cartilaginous exostoses and multiple exostoses.

HISTORY OF LITERATURE  Caesar Hawkins in 1837 is said to have been among the first to describe the condition as "laminated exostoses." However, the report of a typical case occurs in the Lancet for July 23, 1825, in the reports from Guy's Hospital.1 The report discusses a case of Mr. Ashton Key's and the concise description will bear quotation:

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