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May 27, 1939

THE RELATION OF THE PHYSICIAN TO THE TUBERCULOUS PATIENT

Author Affiliations

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

From the Tuberculosis Service of Dr. B. S. Pollak, Medical Director, Hudson County Tuberculosis Hospital.

JAMA. 1939;112(21):2123-2126. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800210017006
Abstract

The past decade can truly be called the beginning of a new era in collapse therapy in pulmonary tuberculosis. It is not my purpose at this time to enter into any discussion of the various forms of collapse now being utilized in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis but rather to dwell on and consider the psychologic and mental phase in the treatment of this disease.

In an analysis of records concerning patients discharged from the Hudson County Tuberculosis Hospital I noted that four times as many patients who were not receiving any form of collapse therapy signed a release as opposed to those who were. In an effort to ascertain the cause for this, three reasons presented themselves: (1) a feeling of well being, (2) conditions at home requiring their return to work, (3) the patient not sufficiently aware of the importance of bed rest in the treatment of tuberculosis

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