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Article
October 24, 1953

ANTISPASMODIC COMPOUND 08958 IN TREATMENT OF PARALYSIS AGITANS

Author Affiliations

Ann Arbor, Mich.

From the Department of Neurology, University Hospital, University of Michigan.

JAMA. 1953;153(8):715-718. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.02940250021006
Abstract

The many new drugs introduced in recent years to relieve the tremor, rigidity, and poverty of movement of paralysis agitans (Parkinson's disease) give testimony to the fact that no universally effective treatment for this disorder has been discovered. The introduction of trihexyphenidyl (Artane)1 was an important advance in therapy, but its effectiveness is limited, and it has not entirely replaced the older solanaceous alkaloids, namely, atropine, scopolamine (Hyoscine), stramonium, and hyoscyamus. Initial successes with synthetic compounds, such as Rabellon,2 which contains belladonna alkaloids, caramiphen hydrochloride (Panparnit),3 diethazine (Diparcol),4 and the antihistaminics, principally diphenhydramine (Benadryl) hydrochloride,5 were encouraging, but these agents now seem to be inadequate for the majority of patients with paralysis agitans and have, for the most part, been reduced to the status of adjunct drugs. Similarly, agents tending to reduce spasticity, the curare derivatives and mephenesin (Tolserol),6 seem to have very limited

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