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Article
November 7, 1953

WHAT PHILADELPHIA PHYSICIANS TELL PATIENTS WITH CANCER

JAMA. 1953;153(10):901-904. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.02940270007002
Abstract

The recent campaign to educate the American layman about cancer has undoubtedly made him "cancer conscious." The leaders of the campaign believe that at present the chief hope of reducing the high cancer death rate depends on treating the disease in its first stages. They have given wide publicity to the symptoms and signs of cancer to encourage the public to seek medical advice early, believing the advantages of early treatment outweigh the disadvantages of producing widespread cancerophobia. The information given to the layman is clear and specific, written by experts in the medical profession; there are pamphlets entitled "Cancer of the Breast," "Cancer of the Digestive Tract," "Cancer of the Rectum," and "What Everyone Should Know About Cancer." To a greater degree than ever before, the public is being taken into the confidence of the medical profession and is being asked to assist in the early diagnosis of a

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