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November 14, 1953

MEPERIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE USED INTRAVENOUSLY BEFORE GASTROSCOPYPRELIMINARY REPORT

JAMA. 1953;153(11):1004-1006. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.02940280012004
Abstract

Most patients undergoing gastroscopic examination are given a barbiturate orally and a narcotic and an anti-spasmodic-antisecretory drug by hypodermic injection.1 The dosage and time of administration of these drugs vary widely. Monat,2 in an analysis of 3,000 cases, studied the effect of morphine, meperidine, and Pantopon (contains the total alkaloids of opium as soluable hydrochlorides) in combination with atropine sulfate and pentobarbital alone as premedication. In conjunction with 2% cocaine topical anesthesia, these drugs were administered subcutaneously or intramuscularly one hour before examination. Pantopon proved most satisfactory, especially in younger persons, while pentobarbital was better in older and less tense patients. Morphine sulfate was next best to Pantopon, although it occasionally produced a severe reaction with chills, and often the patient became so drowsy that examination was not possible. He noted that, with meperidine hydrochloride given intramuscularly, the patients were euphoric, cooperative, and relaxed and that analgesia was

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