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Article
November 14, 1953

ACUTE ULCERATIVE COLITIS SUCCESSFULLY TREATED WITH CHLORAMPHENICOL: REPORT OF CASE DUE TO SALMONELLA PULLORUM

Author Affiliations

Olney, Ill.

JAMA. 1953;153(11):1018-1019. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.02940280026008b
Abstract

The two Salmonella, gallinarum and its variant pullorum, responsible for white diarrhea of chickens, until recently have been considered nonpathogenic for man. An acute gastroenteritis, violent in onset and course, but usually self-limiting in a period of 48 to 72 hours, has been attributed to the S. pullorum. From the first report of this pathogen in 1941, by Edwards and Bruner, until 1950, S. pullorum had been isolated from human patients 39 times. In the case reported, the infection did not follow the usual self-limiting course, and special therapeutic measures were necessary to arrest the course of the disease.

REPORT OF A CASE

This patient was a 42-year-old white woman who was admitted to the Olney Sanitarium with the chief complaint of persistent, bloody diarrhea. Her illness had first started about five weeks prior to admission, with a severe shaking chill followed by a rise of temperature to 102 F.

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