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June 10, 1939

PHOTOSENSITIZING AGENTS: A BRIEF REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Dermatology University School Washington, D. C. and Syphilology, Georgetown of Medicine

JAMA. 1939;112(23):2411-2413. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.62800230002012b
Abstract

My purpose in this paper is to report two cases of pigmentation—one resulting from a photosensitizing dye and the other from a toilet water—and to discuss briefly the parenteral and ingested photosensitizing substances as well as the topical photosensitizers.

Pigmentation of the skin may follow the topical application of a number of photosensitizers, e. g. eosin and eosin compounds, oil of bergamot, oil of lavender, oil of cedar, vanillin oil, perfume, eau de cologne, mercury bichloride, dyes and Dictamnus albus (gas plant).

Substances such as sulfanilamide, gold, silver, hematoporphyrin, acriflavine, eosin, rose bengal, erythrosin (fluorescein) and chlorophyll, when injected into the body, possess the property of sensitizing the skin to light.

Photosensitization in animals has been associated with the eating of buckwheat, clover and sudan grass.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  Miss A. P., aged 30, a brunette, consulted me March 18, 1938, for three dark gray, flat, superficial, pigmented

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