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Article
November 21, 1953

BLEEDING ESOPHAGEAL VARICES WITHOUT OTHER SIGNS OF HYPERTENSION IN A CHILD

JAMA. 1953;153(12):1097-1098. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.02940290056008b
Abstract

There are instances in which a careful investigation fails to reveal the source of massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage. When there are secondary evidences of portal hypertension, one concludes that bleeding varices of the esophagus are the cause. The case presented here illustrates that varices of the esophageal veins may be present and may be the source of fatal hemorrhage in childhood without other signs of portal hypertension.

REPORT OF A CASE

This child was 2½ years old at the time of her first admission to the Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, on April 6, 1950, because of massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage. She had been born at term after an uncomplicated pregnancy, and her growth and development had been normal until diarrhea developed 10 months before this admission. After the child had had several watery stools a day for two weeks, her parents noticed that her stools became black and foul smelling and that she

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