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Article
November 2, 1946

TOMOGRAPHY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF LUNG CARCINOMA

JAMA. 1946;132(9):517-518. doi:10.1001/jama.1946.02870440031012
Abstract

Grossmann1 in 1935 described an apparatus with which he was able to demonstrate clearly pulmonary abnormalities not well shown by other radiographic means. The tomograph has steadily gained new advocates, particularly in England. Roentgenograms of a selected plane or stratum of the patient's body are accomplished by moving the tube and the film during the exposure in such a manner that the images of objects in the selected plane occupy the same positions on the film, while the images of objects in planes above or below that plane are blurred by the movement.

Recently Hartley,2 in a review before the Section on Radiology of the Royal Society of Medicine, made a strong plea for this method of examination of chest lesions, especially when the diagnosis lies between primary carcinoma of the lung, mediastinal tumor or mediastinal metastasis. In these situations early diagnosis becomes more imperative as the possibilities

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