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June 17, 1939

BLOOD SUGAR VERSUS URINE SUGAR: AS OBSERVED IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH PROTAMINE ZINC INSULIN AND WITH ORDINARY INSULIN

Author Affiliations

Chief of Diseases of Metabolism of the Philadelphia General and St. Agnes Hospitals; Chief Metabolic Consultant at the American Oncologic Hospital PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1939;112(24):2503-2508. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800240019006
Abstract

If one reviews the literature on diabetes, especially the mode of diagnosis, the prognosis and the guidance of its treatment, one will find that the great majority of physicians depend much on the chemical analysis of the urine for sugar (dextrose). Indeed, this procedure has many practical advantages: it is easy to obtain a specimen and the examination may be made by the patient, it can be done within a few minutes and repeated as often as desired by the patient or the physician, it is free from the dangers of infection, and the apparatus is simply carried about.

For many years laboratory workers throughout the world have attempted to construct a satisfactory qualitative and quantitative method of studying substances that simulate reducing carbohydrate (true sugar or dextrose) in the urine. Up until the last few decades a reliable study of the elimination of sugar in the urine has been

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