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Article
November 23, 1946

A PLEA FOR A MORE CONSERVATIVE ATTITUDE IN RENAL SURGERY

Author Affiliations

Lincoln, Neb.

JAMA. 1946;132(12):675-679. doi:10.1001/jama.1946.02870470001001
Abstract

Just as in theology one has a conception of "original sin," so for the most part clinical observation impresses one that in the surgical treatment of diseases of the kidney the fetish for nephrectomy comes near to being the surgical "original sin." Renal pathology of sufficient moment to necessitate surgical interference presupposes organic or functional disturbance of such degree that the life of the patient or the integrity of the kidney or both are jeopardized. Recovery can be achieved in these cases by operative intervention. It is, however, unfortunate that this relief is obtained most frequently at the expense of extirpation of the kidney. To the urologist must go credit for the more comprehensive understanding of renal physiology, of anatomy and of the genesis of renal pathology—organic and functional. And yet it may safely be said that the surgeon who is doing renal surgery too often fails to make use

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