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July 8, 1939

MULTIPLE INTRACRANIAL TUMORS: A DISCUSSION OF THE RELATION OF MENINGEAL TO ACOUSTIC TUMORS AND A REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND; NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Neurosurgical Department of the Cleveland Clinic.

JAMA. 1939;113(2):111-113. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800270011003
Abstract

It has been recognized that some relationship exists between meningeal growths and those tumors which arise from the nerve sheaths or their components, but only recently has the nature of this association been given any considerable study. Most of the interest has evolved about that special form of generalized neurofibromatosis in which the central nervous system is predominantly affected. Mainly through the work of Harbitz,1 Preiser and Davenport2 and Schaltenbrand,3 generalized von Recklinghausen's disease has been long recognized as a familial disorder. Only recently, however, has it been shown that central neurofibromatosis is also hereditary in that special form of the disease and may be transmitted as a dominant trait with little or none of the peripheral manifestations of the disorder.4

A special variety of central neurofibromatosis, bilateral acoustic tumors, has been described by Gardner and Frazier5 and Gardner6 and also established on a

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