[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
July 15, 1939

CEREBELLAR TUMOR WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY PARALYSIS: REMOVAL OF TUMOR AND RECOVERY

Author Affiliations

San Diego, Calif.

JAMA. 1939;113(3):207-209. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.72800280001006a

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Acute respiratory failure followed by removal of a brain tumor, survival and recovery is sufficiently unusual to justify reporting. The case emphasizes the fact that relief of increased intracranial pressure associated with brain tumor may become an acute emergency measure, illustrates the value of ventricular puncture and drainage, and shows that respiratory failure, though usually fatal, does not necessarily indicate an altogether hopeless prognosis.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.—  Jean D., a girl aged 14 years, was seen in neurosurgical consultation for Dr. Ernest Thelen April 16, 1937, approximately five minutes after the patient had ceased breathing. The only information available at that time was that the patient had been ill for about three months with loss of weight, headache and failing vision. She had been under treatment for intestinal influenza and the day before (April 15) had been admitted to San Diego County Hospital under the provisional diagnosis of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×