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July 15, 1939

SALYRGAN SUPPOSITORIES AND MERCURIN: A WARNING and ACCEPTANCE OF SALYRGAN SUPPOSITORIES RESCINDED

JAMA. 1939;113(3):213-214. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.72800280007008

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Abstract

Salyrgan, which is sodium [o(hydroxymercuricmethoxypropylcarbamyl) phenoxy] acetate, was accepted by the Council (The Journal, Dec. 22, 1928, p. 1995) on evidence presented by the manufacturer, the Winthrop Chemical Company, of its usefulness as a mercurial diuretic. In 1937 the firm presented as a dosage form Suppositories Salyrgan of the following composition: salyrgan 0.4 Gm., corn starch 0.1 Gm., and cocoa butter 1.3 Gm. Since the rectal administration of a mercurial diuretic seemed rational, the Council accepted Salyrgan Suppositories as a dosage form of Salyrgan, and the description was published in The Journal, May 15, 1937, page 1715. For the same reason the Council accepted Mercurin Suppositories, 0.5 Gm., distributed by the Campbell Products, Inc., and its description was published in The Journal, July 10, 1937, page 133. Mercurin is a mixture of 20 per cent of the β-methoxy-γ-hydroxymercuri-propylamide of trimethyl cyclopentane dicarboxylic acid and 80 per cent of its sodium

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