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July 15, 1939

RECTAL IRRITATION FOLLOWING THE USE OF MERCURIAL DIURETICS IN SUPPOSITORY FORM

JAMA. 1939;113(3):214-215. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.72800280008008a
Abstract

For the past year the effects of mercurial diuretics, when given in the form of a suppository by rectum, have been studied on patients with congestive heart failure. In view of untoward local effects that occurred with the use of one of the prepararations now on the market, it seems advisable to report our results in this respect.

Two mercurial diuretics have become available in suppository form for the treatment of edematous conditions. The first to be introduced, in 1934, by Engel1 is that of Mercurin.2 The second preparation is that of Salyrgan.3

The only mercurial suppository for which, at the present time, there are any references in the literature, is that of Mercurin. Numerous reports4 are in favor of the clinical efficiency and usefulness of this preparation. In addition, rectal irritation appears to be minimal, for other than a slight "burning" of the mucosa there

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