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May 20, 1950

USE OF SODIUM PROPIONATE IN EXTERNAL INFECTIONS OF THE EYES

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Mount Sinai Hospital and the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital.

JAMA. 1950;143(3):226-228. doi:10.1001/jama.1950.02910380010004
Abstract

The lower fatty acids have recently been shown to be of great value in the treatment of external infections of the eyes. Sodium propionate (C2H5COONa), the sodium salt of one of these acids, has now been used in about 1,200 patients with infections of the lids, conjunctiva and cornea, and the results obtained compare most favorably with those noted with other antibiotics. Experimental studies have also been made. The drug is virtually nontoxic; it is effective against all the bacteria causing common ocular infections and against fungi, whose importance in blepharitis is now being appreciated, and its use does not result in allergies or sensitivities. These and other advantages will be detailed later.

HISTORY OF FATTY ACID THERAPY  For the complete history of the development of the medical use of the lower fatty acids the reader is referred to the papers of Peck and Russ1

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