[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 16, 1947

CLINICAL EVALUATION OF VASCULAR DAMAGE IN DIABETES MELLITUS

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Metabolism Service of Mount Sinai Hospital.

JAMA. 1947;134(16):1289-1291. doi:10.1001/jama.1947.02880330011004
Abstract

The discovery of insulin twenty-five years ago served to avert the catastrophic threat to life represented by diabetes mellitus but unfortunately initiated an attitude of complacency in the members of the medical profession. What was intended as a palliative became the panacea; control of the blood sugar level was interpreted as control of the disease. But "maintenance of life is not sufficient in itself as a goal in the treatment of diabetes mellitus."1 The optimism of that early period is now being dissipated by a number of anxious reports2 on the mounting incidence of seemingly inevitable degenerative sequelae. Rosenbusch3 has concluded a painstakingly thorough study of 88 diabetic children with the following: "The prognosis of diabetes in childhood—taking a long view—is in spite of the progress of dietary and insulin treatment more adverse than had originally been expected." Joslin4 has found evidence of vascular damage in

×