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October 28, 1950

DISSEMINATED MYCOTIC DISEASE: Report of Three Cases

Author Affiliations

Lincoln, Neb.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, United States Veterans Administration Hospital, Lincoln, Neb.

JAMA. 1950;144(9):747-749. doi:10.1001/jama.1950.02920090021006
Abstract

Certain fungi are pathogenic to man, but only a few appear capable of invading deeper structures. Actinomycosis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, torulosis, moniliasis and sporotrichosis represent a group of mycotic diseases which occur in the United States and which may become disseminated, often terminating fatally. Infection may disseminate by direct extension to adjacent tissues or by the lymph or blood stream to remote parts of the body to involve any number of internal organs, including the central nervous system. The resulting syndromes resemble many other disease states commonly involving these structures, making the diagnosis of generalized mycotic diseases at times difficult and often entirely unsuspected. Diagnosis is possible by finding the causative organism in body fluids, sputums, exudates, purulent discharges or biopsy specimens from involved tissues when available. Within the past few years three cases of generalized mycotic infection have come to my attention and are herewith presented.

DISSEMINATED TORULOSIS 

Case 

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