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October 30, 1954

CHANGING ROLE OF NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY IN MEDICINECHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS

JAMA. 1954;156(9):833-835. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02950090029009
Abstract

It is now some 35 years since Dr. W. J. Mayo, after hearing a discussion by Harvey Cushing before the American College of Surgeons, declared, "Gentlemen, today we have witnessed the birth of a new specialty— neurological surgery." This energetic offspring, by its amazing and glamorous development, attracted the attention of both the profession and the laity. This was not always an admiring attention, for at times neurology regarded its progeny as some Frankensteinian monster that threatened to devour its parent. But as the specialty grew, guided by the sharp counsels of surgery and the cautious admonitions of neurology, it was evident that the maturing issue was moulded after neither of its parents. Although steeped in the traditions and the training of a surgeon, the adolescent sought, as a disciple of neurology, all that might aid him in his endeavors yet spurned to put on its austere mantle. The advent

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