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Article
November 20, 1954

THE AMERICAN PHYSICIAN AND WORLD HEALTH

JAMA. 1954;156(12):1150-1151. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02950120024007
Abstract

A look at the world shows all too clearly that it is a troubled globe, that the international scene is in profound upheaval. At first glance the picture is chaotic. Too many peoples and too many nations are struggling for goals that are apparently incompatible. The United Nations seems to be faced with insurmountable problems to whose solution physicians can hardly hope to contribute. But when one looks at the world again through the spectacles of professional training, some familiar social patterns emerge. Most of the turmoil seems to emanate from areas of the world in which most of the people are sick and poor. Sickness and poverty and demonstrations of their interrelationship belong to everyday practical experiences. Everyone has seen a family disintegrate when the father is incapacitated by tuberculosis, or revive when the mother was cured of a hitherto unsuspected anemia.

SICKNESS AND POVERTY—ENEMY OF WHO  The World

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