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Article
January 10, 1948

EFFECTS OF URETHANE IN THE TREATMENT OF LEUKEMIA AND METASTATIC MALIGNANT TUMORS

Author Affiliations

Milwaukee

From the Department of Medicine, Marquette University School of Medicine, Milwaukee, Veterans Hospital, Wood, Wis., and Milwaukee County Hospital.

JAMA. 1948;136(2):90-95. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02890190018005
Abstract

The results in the treatment of chronic leukemia with urethane (ethyl carbamate), reported by Paterson, Haddow, ApThomas and Watkinson,1 were sufficiently promising to stimulate further clinical investigation of this drug. We are presenting a report of our observations of the effect of urethane on leukemia and some of the malignant neoplastic diseases.

Urethane (H2N.CO.OC2H5) was first synthesized by Dumas2 in 1834 from ethyl chloroformate and ammonia. White crystals are formed which are readily soluble in water and many of the commonly used organic solvents. It belongs to a group of organic esters of carbamic acid which are known collectively as urethanes because of their structural similarity to urea. The term "urethane" has been generally applied to ethyl carbamate itself. Carbamic acid is.unstable and has not been isolated in the free state.

Although an extensive literature concerning urethane exists there are many gaps in

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