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Article
January 31, 1948

GRANULOMA INGUINALE OF THE VAGINA AND CERVIX UTERI WITH BONE METASTASES

Author Affiliations

Memphis, Tenn.

From the Divisions of Preventive Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Pathology and Bacteriology, University of Tennessee College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1948;136(5):327-329. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.72890220006009
Abstract

Since McLeod's description in 1882 of granuloma inguinale as a "serpiginous or lupoid ulceration of the genitalia," this disease has been more clearly differentiated from other granulomatous lesions of the genitalia and the vagaries of its clinical manifestations have received increasing attention. Earlier concepts of the progress of this infection solely by serpiginous spread or by autoinoculation have been broadened in recent years as a result of accumulated evidence of lymphatic spread and involvement.1 Examples of the latter are the inguinal "pseudobubo"1a following the primary genital lesion, the demonstration of the Donovan bodies in regional lymph nodes1a,b and the elephantiasis of the genitalia2 which may occur in this disease. To lymphatic spread has also been attributed the extensive involvement of the pelvic organs following granuloma inguinale of the cervix and vagina.3 Of significance are the pronounced systemic manifestations which are frequently associated with lesions in

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