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Article
February 28, 1948

INTRATHECAL THERAPY NOT REQUIRED FOR H. INFLUENZAE MENINGITIS: A Report of 28 Cases

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From Municipal Contagious Disease and Cook County Contagious Disease Hospitals.

JAMA. 1948;136(9):597-601. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02890260005002
Abstract

Since 1939, when Alexander1 developed specific type B anti-influenzal rabbit serum, interest in influenzal meningitis has been greatly intensified. Many reports of recoveries have been published during the past five years, and much has been written concerning this disease, which was formerly almost universally fatal.2 Nevertheless, although sulfonamide compounds, specific serum and streptomycin are all valuable therapeutic aids, there is no standard accepted for their application. Those who make use of intrathecal treatment cling tenaciously to the method as an old established custom which cannot be relinquished. However, more than twelve years ago one3 of us reported on the exclusive use of intravenous therapy for patients with meningitis and demonstrated its advantages, including lowered fatality rates,4 when large doses of serum were injected and intrathecal therapy was abandoned. Although when first inaugurated this plan applied to meningococcic infections, it was soon found equally effective for all

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