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Article
January 22, 1955

CRITICAL REEVALUATION OF ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY IN SURGERY

JAMA. 1955;157(4):305-309. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950210001001
Abstract

The current necessity of national preparedness for the care of mass casualties resulting from enemy action and the demands of everyday civilian practice have instigated this critical reevaluation of antibiotic therapy in surgery. The prospect that 100,000 or more civilian and military casualties might suddenly result in the United States from an atomic attack emphasizes the importance of reviewing methods of suppressing infections in wounds of violence and in controlling surgical infections in general.1 In the travels of one of us (W. A. A.) throughout the United States and the battle areas of Korea during the past 15 months, it was noted that many surgeons believed that infections developing in wounds were of no great importance and that no real problems remained in the prevention or control of infections because of the many antibiotic agents available. This is indicative of the blind reliance of some surgeons on antibiotic therapy

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