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Article
February 12, 1955

EFFECT OF CIGARETTE SMOKING IN THE NORMAL PERSON

JAMA. 1955;157(7):569. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950240007002
Abstract

In view of the present controversy aroused by the paper of Hammond and Horn1 at the American Medical Association San Francisco Meeting, it was felt that these findings, which have been under consideration for the past two and one-half years, would have more significance today than when the work was begun. There are but a few objective methods that attempt to register the effect of tobacco on the human heart. One of the simplest and easiest methods of determining the psychological response of tobacco on the heart2 is the use of the ballistocardiograph. The instrument used in this study was the Pordy modification of the Dock ballistocardiograph machine. Two types of tracings, the electromagnetic and the photoelectric curves, were taken in the beginning of these studies. The former records the velocity and the latter, displacement. Later only the velocity type was used. This was done because, of all

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