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February 12, 1955

DOCTORS AND THE PRESS FROM A SCIENCE WRITER'S POINT OF VIEW

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Associated Press.

JAMA. 1955;157(7):586-588. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950240024009
Abstract

A friend of mine came down to breakfast the other morning rather badly hung over from a long intemperate night before. As he stared dully across the breakfast table, his wife remarked, "My goodness, darling, your eyes are bloodshot!" His only answer was, "You should see them from my side."

Today, I am to talk from the viewpoint, if not through the bloodshot eyes, of the newspaper science writer.

A definition of legitimate medical news is, to me, the same as a definition of news of any kind. News is whatever is interesting and significant to human beings. In order to make it worth its appearance in newspapers, it must of course be interesting and significant to a fairly large number of persons.

It is perfectly obvious that people are interested in themselves, in their own health, and in their own chances for long life. This is the force which

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