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Article
April 17, 1948

RELIEF OF MORPHINE ADDICTION BY PREFRONTAL LOBOTOMY

Author Affiliations

Buffalo

From the Buffalo General Hospital and University of Buffalo School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1948;136(16):1039-1040. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.72890330001008
Abstract

Since the development of psychosurgery, initiated by Egas Moniz1 in 1935 and later advanced by Freeman and Watts2 in the United States, therapeutic results have been attained in mainly two fields of endeavor; one in psychiatry, the other directed toward the relief of intractable pain. This case report analyzes a heretofore unrecorded situation of an unusual type of chronic pain associated with the habitual use of tremendous quantities of morphine sulfate, being relieved by prefrontal lobotomy.

REPORT OF CASE  Mr. A. C., a draftsman aged 39 years, was admitted to the Buffalo General Hospital on June 16, 1947. Three years earlier he had sustained a laminectomy for spinal epidural abscess extending from the eighth to the twelfth dorsal vertebra. He survived with spastic paraplegia, a sensory level reaching approximately the nipple line and sphincter difficulty. Over the intervening three years he had been nursed efficiently by his

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