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Article
June 5, 1948

VALUE OF CONSERVATIVE MANAGEMENT IN CERVICOBRACHIAL PAIN

Author Affiliations

Boston

From the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, the Lahey Clinic.

JAMA. 1948;137(6):508-513. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02890400012002
Abstract

The complaint of pain in the neck, shoulders and extending into the arm is of relatively frequent occurrence. It is believed that the cause or combination of causes which can bring on these symptoms is not widely understood and, therefore, it is the purpose of this paper to review the various etiologic factors that may produce cervicobrachial pain, and in particular to stress the favorable results obtained by conservative treatment.

To avoid confusion, I have arbitrarily omitted consideration of patients with symptoms resulting from pathologic changes in the shoulder such as subacromial bursitis or a tear in the musculotendinous cuff; i. e., conditions which do not cause interference with the neurovascular structures. I wish to emphasize, however, agreement with Freiberg1 that lesions of the shoulder girdle may initiate cervicobrachial pain by concomitant diffuse muscle spasm accompanying the lesion. Such pain may likewise follow voluntary splinting of the affected arm

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