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Article
April 16, 1955

DEVELOPMENT OF ANALGESIA AFTER A CENTURY OF ANESTHESIA

JAMA. 1955;157(16):1399-1403. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950330039007
Abstract

A new, safer, more pleasant era in the art and science of pain relief may not be too far in the future. On July 30, 1953,I produced in three persons a state I have tried to bring about before, sometimes successfully. Using a new drug, Dolitrone (5-ethyl-6-phenyl-meta-thiazane-2, 4-dione), I brought about this much-sought state—a general condition in which the patient retains some consciousness, but at the same time sensibility to pain is so reduced that the patient can tolerate some operative pain. The patient may not remember anything of the operative procedure and will not have been hurt enough to complain, then or later. A patient who exemplifies this state at a superficial level might be able to sleep in spite of icteric pruritus. I thought that a badly burned patient, if placed in this same state, but at a more profound level, might be made comfortable. Now, Dr. Paul

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