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Article
July 30, 1955

UNILATERAL TRIPLICATION OF THE URETER: REPORT OF A PATIENT WITH THREE RENAL PELVES AND THREE URÈTERAL ORIFICES

JAMA. 1955;158(13):1066-1068. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02960130020010
Abstract

The frequency of the recognition of anomalies of the kidney and ureter has greatly increased with the diagnostic aids at the disposal of the present-day physician. Unilateral triplication of the ureter is one of the least common of these anomalies. Before discussing the incidence and presenting a survey of the literature, a definition of true triplication of the ureter is necessary. Too often this entity has been confused with "trifid ureters" and "triplicate fused ureters." In attempting to use a single phrase to describe the unilateral occurrence of three ureters, each connected with its own pelvis in the kidney and having its own ureteral orifice in the bladder, we had been using the term "complete" triplication of the ureter. Narath * correctly called our attention to the fact that the words "complete triplication of ureters" were not descriptive of the abnormality we had in mind. As an example, he stated

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