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Article
August 6, 1955

PUBLIC HEALTH IMPLICATIONS IN A PROGRAM OF VACCINATION AGAINST POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.; Bethesda, Md.

Surgeon General, U. S. Public Health Service, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (Dr. Scheele), and Associate Director, National Institutes of Health, U. S. Public Health Service, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (Dr. Shannon).

JAMA. 1955;158(14):1249-1258. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02960140011002
Abstract

In public health and preventive medicine, the application of a new prophylactic agent, whether to large population groups or to an individual patient, requires careful consideration of many factors. The safety, potency, and efficacy of the agent are primary considerations. To these must be added problems of dosage, methods of administration, and the possibility of undesirable reactions in patients. In the case of large-scale immunization programs, account must also be taken of the cost and availability of the agent and the organization of personnel and facilities. These many technical, medical, and administrative problems must be weighed against the seriousness of the disease and the vulnerability of particular population groups. The use of the Salk vaccine against paralytic poliomyelitis has presented all of these general problems and some specific problems that were unanticipated by many individuals and groups working with the program. Our purpose is to present a brief report on

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