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Article
October 9, 1948

SCOTTISH EXPERIMENTS IN SOCIAL MEDICINE

Author Affiliations

Director, Bureau of Medical Economic Research

JAMA. 1948;138(6):450. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.62900060020025
Abstract

The Department of Health for Scotland, under the direction of Sir Andrew Davidson, has undertaken several studies and experiments.1 Analysis of morbidity statistics for the immediate prewar period revealed a surprising amount of chronic incapacity among the working population, particularly at ages under 40 years. Of 25,900,000 working days lost by 1,800,000 insured wage earners in the year ending June 30, 1948, 44 per cent was due to illnesses rendering 31,000 persons unfit for work throughout the entire year. Clinical data were obtained for over 50,000 patients incapacitated for three months or longer; 1,000 of these cases were subjected to intensive study. Results indicated the importance of early diagnosis and treatment in conserving the working capacity of wage earners; they also showed a need for periodic review of diagnosis and treatment in prolonged illnesses, with close cooperation between personal physician and specialist services.

AN EXPERIMENT IN PREVENTIVE MEDICINE  Early

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