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Article
October 30, 1948

STREPTOMYCIN IN TOPICAL THERAPY: I. Its Sensitizing Property

Author Affiliations

Cincinnati

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the College of Medicine of the University of Cincinnati.

JAMA. 1948;138(9):640-641. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02900090014003
Abstract

Up to the present time streptomycin has not been used topically as extensively as penicillin, chiefly because of the limitations, expense and availability. Perhaps, also, the reactions from topically administered penicillin, after the initial enthusiasm, may be another factor in determining the reluctance to use streptomycin topically. In the field of dermatology, streptomycin has been used topically by Sulzberger and Baer,1 Calloway2 and Senturia and Broh-Kahn.3 There have been a few reports of the reactions from topically employed streptomycin. These reports have been infrequent also perhaps because of infrequent use. Nichols and Herrell4 indicated that contact dermatitis may result in those handling streptomycin. A case was reported by Feldman5 in which an eczematous type of sensitivity was proved in patch tests to be due to the streptomycin. Strauss and Warring6 reported 4 cases of clinical epidermal sensitivity to streptomycin and 2 additional cases of

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