[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 6, 1948

DERMATITIS RESULTING FROM CONTACT WITH MOTHS (GENUS HYLESIA): Report of Cases

Author Affiliations

Boston

From the United States Marine Hospital, Brighton, Mass.

JAMA. 1948;138(10):737-740. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02900100017004
Abstract

Dermatitis as a result of contact with the brown tail moth (Euproctis chrysorrhea Linn) was first observed in the United States by White1 in 1901. The rash was noted a few minutes to several hours after exposure to the cocoon, caterpillar or adult moth and either remained localized at the site of contact or became generalized. The most frequently occurring lesion2 was a discrete erythematous maculopapule occurring singly or in groups, which in the cases of severe disease coalesced to form urticarial wheals. Steele and Sawyer3 described wheals with vesicular or shallow necrotic centers. Pruritus was a constant complaint and was described as mild to intense; constitutional symptoms were not noted. The duration of the eruption varied from five to seven days, although in rare instances several weeks elapsed before resolution.

While it was recognized early that the dermatitis was provoked by the nettling hairs functioning as

×