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Article
November 13, 1948

CANCER OF THE LUNG IN CHROMATE WORKERS

JAMA. 1948;138(11):823. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02900110033012
Abstract

The alarming rise in the incidence of cancer of the lung during the last three decades in many countries advanced death from this tumor into second place on the cancer mortality list for males. The majority of investigators found that occupational factors did not play any demonstrable part in pulmonary cancers and could not account for the increase. However, such conclusions were drawn as a rule from the data in patients' histories, and were, therefore, of little scientific value. Specific occupational exposures responsible for industrial cancers are usually sustained some three to thirty years previous to the manifestation of the cancer and for this reason usually appear to be without relation to the occupational information of the general type recorded in patients' histories and death certificates. The recent report by Machle and Gregorius1 on cancer of the lung among workers in seven American chromate plants provides definite evidence of

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