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Article
December 4, 1948

EMBOLISM AND THROMBOSIS IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE: Chairman's Address

Author Affiliations

Pasadena, Calif.

JAMA. 1948;138(14):1009-1012. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02900140001001
Abstract

The problem of embolism and peripheral venous thrombosis has always been a major one in the treatment of heart disease and particularly of coronary heart disease. This is due to the prevalence of mural thrombi in the chambers of the heart, which may serve as a source of emboli, and to the occurrence of peripheral venous thrombi, especially in the legs. Several articles on the subject have appeared in the literature of the last few years, a splendid summary of which is given by Hellerstein and Martin,1 who also give their own observations in 160 cases of myocardial infarction occurring in a total of 2,000 autopsies at the University Hospitals in Cleveland. In 45 per cent of the cases in their series there were emboli or thrombi in other parts of the body, a total of one hundred and eleven peripheral thromboembolic lesions being found. In 12 per cent

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