[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.175.121.230. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 4, 1948

HISTIDINE AND ASCORBIC ACID TREATMENT OF ARTERIOSCLEROSIS OBLITERANS: With Radioactive Isotope Estimations of Circulatory Effects

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Hektoen Institute for Medical Research at the Cook County Hospital and the Department of Surgery, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University.

JAMA. 1948;138(14):1036-1039. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02900140028006
Abstract

A better understanding of the role of the sympathetic nervous system, antisympathetic drugs, antibiotics and refrigeration has converted the emergency amputation to an elective procedure. The surgeon, confronted with a gangrenous extremity, now has several aids that he may use to save the patient's life and to conserve tissue formerly sacrificed. Increasing interest in the conservative management of certain sequelae of vascular disease is evidenced by such recent reports as those of Wirtschafter and Widmann.1 This report contains our experience with the use of histidine and ascorbic acid in the conservative treatment of one type of peripheral vascular disease as first suggested by Wirtschafter and Widmann.

Holtz2 advanced the theory that histamine was formed in vitro and in vivo by the action of ascorbic acid with histidine. Block and Pinösch3 found that there was an increase of histamine in the lungs of guinea pigs following administration of

×