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Article
December 18, 1948

SACRIFICE OF BONE LENGTH IN RECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES: Chairman's Address

Author Affiliations

Greenville, S. C.

JAMA. 1948;138(16):1133-1134. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02900160001001
Abstract

At the risk of criticism from the perfectionist, I have chosen for his formal discourse a basic principle which, to my knowledge at least, has never before been discussed as an entity in traumatic or orthopedic reconstruction operations.

As some of you will appreciate, in enumerating examples of this principle, the shortening procedures about to be discussed have long been employed by me. I have advocated in several papers technics which I hope have justified their being published in spite of their occasional glaring anatomic compromises.1

Oliver Wendell Holmes has given us an anecdote about Benjamin Franklin which seems appropriate for this occasion. Franklin, early in his career, apprenticed to his brother as a printer's devil; one day in going down a steep stairway into the low studded basement beneath the print shop hit his head painfully against the ceiling when he did not stoop enough. His brother who

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