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Article
November 5, 1955

PREVIOUSLY UNRECOGNIZED TRANSMISSIBLE AGENT IN HUMAN BLOODEXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL STUDIES

JAMA. 1955;159(10):989-994. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02960270009003
Abstract

In the course of erythrocyte survival studies reported elsewhere,1 cells from a single healthy donor were injected into six recipients. An influenza-like febrile illness occurred in five of the six recipients about two weeks after the injection. Serial transmission of blood collected during the acute phase of this illness caused a similar syndrome in new recipients. Further evidence of a causal relationship between these red blood cell transfusions and the subsequent appearance of a febrile illness was obtained by examining the clinical histories of persons previously receiving blood from the same donor. Some information regarding the nature of the transmissible agent has also been obtained.

MATERIALS AND METHODS 

Volunteers.—  Except for one student volunteer from the University of Chicago, all of the donors and recipients were prison inmate volunteers. Only occasional, sporadic cases of short undifferentiated febrile illnesses were observed in the period during which these observations were made.

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