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Article
November 12, 1955

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH WARFARIN (COUMADIN) SODIUM, A NEW ANTICOAGULANT

JAMA. 1955;159(11):1094-1097. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02960280016004
Abstract

Although the presently available anticoagulants have been of great clinical usefulness, well-recognized defects are inherent in them. Heparin requires frequent parenteral administration and is costly. Bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) has a long latent period between the time of administration and onset of therapeutic effect. Ethyl biscoumacetate (Tromexan) loses therapeutic effect within a few hours after reaching the therapeutic level, thus rendering smooth control of anticoagulant action difficult. Other of the newer anticoagulants posses undesirable side-reactions. A more nearly ideal anticoagulant continues to be a practical need. For this reason a clinical study has been conducted on warfarin (Coumadin) sodium, one of the group of coumarin drugs produced by Dr. Karl Paul Link and his group at the University of Wisconsin.1 The substance, 3-(α-phenyl-β-acetylethyl)-4-hydroxycoumarin, is highly active as a hypoprothrombinemic agent, is soluble and stable, and is suitable for intravenous use. The relationship of warfarin sodium to bishydroxycoumarin is shown in fig.

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